Business, Medien 2.0, Verlage, Web 2.0 - Written by Peter Bihr on Mittwoch, 13. August, 2008 16:53 - 0 Kommentare

Was dürfen digitale Bücher kosten?

XO Laptop Generation 2, image courtesy laptop.org“Was dürfen digitale Bücher kosten?”, fragt Andrew Savikas in TOC: Sollten sich die Preise für digitale Produkte eher am Printprodukt orientieren oder eher am Vertriebspreis digitaler Produkte (also näherungsweise null)?

In einer Diskussion über O’Reillys eBook-Bundles ergänzt Leser David Taylor:

It seems to me though that your attempts to price “at a discount” from print books are misguided at best and silly at worst.

You need to start thinking in terms of “at an increment” from ZERO. The web is a huge place and offers amazing content for free. You would be wise to consider how much EXTRA you want to make from your existing paper publishing business. If you were only publishing digitally then I do agree that you need to take the discount approach.

On the other hand, if you price your digital content incrementally, then you stand to actually make more money overall. This argues for DRM but that capability is built in to the Adobe ePub model, so that should not be hard.

Ob DRM (Digital Rights Management, zu deutsch Digitale Rechteverwaltung) tatsächlich der richtige Weg wären, sei dahingestellt. (Ich gehe davon aus, dass es nie eine gute Idee ist, eigenen Kunden künstlich Nutzungsbeschränkungen aufzuerlegen.) Die Frage, woran sich Preise digitaler Inhalte allerdings orientieren sollten, ist sehr valide und wichtig.

Womöglich liegt die Antwort allerdings ganz woanders: In der Einfachheit, die runde Preise bieten, so denkt zumindest Adam Hodkin vom Exact Editions Blog:

At this stage in the development of the ebook market, book publishers who think about digital pricing tend to work back from the print price, to find a satisfactory, ebook price at 50% or 60% or X% of the list price of the print work [...]. It will take a bit of time before publishers and marketers realise that the cost of production, in the sense of ‘unit cost’, has no conceivable bearing on the digital pricing, whether for outright sale or for an annual subscription. The chances are that in the medium term ebook prices will migrate to some more or less fixed pricing levels: $2.99, $4.99, $9.99, perhaps $19.99. Simplicity will be a virtue and digital books will be seen as having some natural price points (cf CDs or DVDs).

Pricing digital books for institutional use is a completely different matter. This is an area in which book publishers who want to service institutional markets with effective subscription services will need to do some creative thinking. Charging as much as possible will not be a clever long-term strategy.

Wie sollten digitale Produkte bepreist werden? Anregungen und Ideen bitte in die Kommentare!



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